Posts Tagged DC

DC at night

Some might claim that Washington, DC, is in a permanent state of night following the last month’s odd goings on, but this is a little different.

I attended a conference in DC in November and my friend Phil came down for a couple days of sightseeing and photography after the conference.

When I go to DC I always go to The Wall and pay my respects to a few friends and shipmates. After that I wander The Mall and then head back to the hotel. Phil wanted to do some night photography and that sounded like a good idea. Since this is a big city, we weren’t about to see many stars, so that left the monuments and the surprising crowd around them, even in the dark. I had a little Platypod, a small metal plate that serves as a tripod substitute if I’m too lazy to carry the real thing. From that I got a couple interesting images. With a tripod I might have had a few different angles, but what I got worked pretty well.

There was a young man on a bicycle with multicolored lights at the ends of the spokes, so, of course, a longish exposure might just capture some interesting motion. I suppose if I had kept the shutter open even longer, the streak of color would have been wider, but this is not too bad (click on the images for a better view):

 

Lights on the spokes

Lights on the spokes

 

I just read an article that reported on a survey done of political science professors in having them rate the Presidents of the United States based on several different factors. Of course, the top two were Abraham Lincoln and George Washington. It makes sense, therefore, that they have monuments built to them on the Mall and that they are well-lit and well-visited at night. Here they are:

 

Lincoln Memorial:

 

Lincoln Memorial at night

Lincoln Memorial at night

 

Washington Monument:

 

Washington Monument at night

Washington Monument at night

 

Yes, our Nation’s Capitol is quite a treat even at night.

More to follow

Bob

 

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A Little Side Trip

After the trip to the desert, I had about 14 hours to wash the sand out of my clothes, repack and head for Virginia. The National Telehealth Resource Center Coalition (my colleagues from around the country) held a meeting in Richmond for a couple days. During lunch one day, a friend suggested I join him in Washington, DC, to do a little photography. Didn’t take more than one suggestion and I had a train ticket in hand.

Whenever I’m near DC, I feel the need to do a pilgrimage to The Wall to pay my respects to a few old shipmates and Teammates. A foto trip was as good a reason as any to go and the visit to The Wall was an added benefit.

I don’t do much street photography. I always feel like I’m violating someone’s privacy when I photograph them, even if it’s a well-established concept that if they’re in public they really have no expectation of privacy. At The Wall, I found an interesting scene I felt compelled to record. A family stood reflected in the monument. I made up a story that went along with the scene. The family was with a young boy, about ten or so. I had a feeling that they were explaining to the young man why he never knew his grandfather, but where he could always come to find him.

 

Reflections at the Wall

Reflections at the Wall

 

There’s another story, too. Above The Wall is a sculpture of three soldiers. They’re in battle gear and looking at The Wall in the distance. Kind of like they were wondering where all 58,000 of the men and women whose names were etched in the black granite are. Maybe if they look again, they’ll find the lost ones. As I zoomed in on the faces of the soldiers, the usual sense of grief struck. I’d held it off for quite a while. But like last summer, when I visited and an old veteran (you know, my age) started playing taps on his bugle, it came on in a wave. Maybe we’ll find them someday.

 

Three Soldiers at the Wall

Three Soldiers at the Wall

 

RIP, Erwin Harder, Captain Pitzen, Mr. Pender, Mr. Greeleaf and Mr. McKinney. And thank you for enriching my life when I was with you.

 

More to follow,

Bob

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